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World War II and the War Measures Act
1941 Jan. 7   A Special Committee of the Cabinet War Committee recommends that Japanese Canadians not be allowed to volunteer for the armed services on the grounds that there is strong public opinion against them.
1941 Mar. to Aug. Registration card thumbnail image - click for larger photo Compulsory registration of all Japanese Canadians over 16 years is carried out by the RCMP.
1941 Dec. 7 Pearl Harbor attack thumbnail image - click for larger photo Japan attacks Pearl Harbor. Canada declares war on Japan. Under the War Measures Act, Order in Council P.C. 9591, all Japanese nationals and those naturalized after 1922 are required to register with the Registrar of Enemy Aliens.
1941 Dec. 8 Fishing boats impounded thumbnail image - click for larger photo 1,200 fishing boats are impounded and put under the control of the Japanese Fishing Vessel Disposal Committee. Japanese language newspapers and schools closed. Insurance policies are cancelled.
1941 Dec. 16   P.C. 9760 is passed requiring mandatory registration of all persons of Japanese origin, regardless of citizenship, with Registrar of Enemy Aliens.
1942 Jan. 16 Japanese Canadians removed from coast thumbnail image - click for larger photo P.C. 365 designated an area 100 miles inland from the west coast as a “protected area”.
1942 Feb. 7 Prisoner of war camp in Angler thumbnail image - click for larger photo All male “enemy aliens” between the ages of 18-45 are forced to leave the protected coastal area before April 1. Most are sent to work on road camps in the Rockies. Some are sent to Angler.
1942 Feb. 24   P.C. 1486 empowers the Minister of Justice to control the movements of all persons of Japanese origin in the protected area.
1942 Feb. 26 children escorted by police thumbnail image - click for larger photo Notice is issued by the Minister of Justice ordering all persons of “the Japanese race” to leave the coast. Cars, cameras and radios confiscated. Dusk-to-dawn curfew is imposed.
1942 Mar. 4 Bicycle store thumbnail image - click for larger photo B.C. Security Commission is established to plan, supervise and direct the expulsion of Japanese Canadians.
P.C. 1665 Property and belongings are entrusted to the Custodian of Enemy Alien Property as a "protective measure only".
1942 Mar. 16 soldiers stuff straw mattresses thumbnail image - click for larger photo First arrival at Vancouver's Hastings Park holding center. All Japanese Canadian mail is censored from this date.
1942 Mar. 25 Families in a shack thumbnail image - click for larger photo B.C. Security Commission initiates a program of assigning men to road camps and women and children to ghost town detention camps.
1942 June 29   P.C. 5523 - The Director of Soldier Settlement is given authority to purchase or lease farms owned by Japanese Canadians. He subsequently buys 572 farms without consulting the owners.
1942 Oct.   22,000 persons of whom 75% are Canadian citizens (60% Canadian born, 15% naturalized) have been uprooted forcibly from the coast.
1943 Jan. 23 Confiscated store thumbnail image - click for larger photo Order in Council grants the Custodian of Enemy Alien Property the right to dispose of Japanese Canadian properties in his care without the owners' consent.
1944 Aug. 4 Forced to leave thumbnail image - click for larger photo Prime Minister King states it is desirable that Japanese Canadians are dispersed across Canada.
Applications for “voluntary repatriation” to Japan are sought by the Canadian government. Those who do not must move east of the Rockies to prove their loyalty to Canada. “Repatriation” for many means exile to a country they have never seen before.
1945 Jan. Japanese Canadian soldiers thumbnail image - click for larger photo 150 second generation Japanese Canadians (nisei) are accepted into the Canadian Intelligence Corps after pressure from the British government.
1945 Sept. 2 atom bomb thumbnail image - click for larger photo Japan surrenders after atom bomb is dropped on Hiroshima.
All internment camps, except New Denver are ordered closed and settlements of shacks bulldozed. B.C. Security Commission office in New Denver closes in 1957.

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